Sunday, December 11, 2011

Attack on Democracy In America Continues, Three Stories From This Week


This fall we have seen the best and now the worst in American democracy. In the early part of the fall we saw thousands people all over the country peacefully gather to occupy public space and protest economic injustice and a government firmly in the hands of a wealthy elite. The response all across the country was to stop the movement before it had any chance to grow. In city after city police in riot gear were sent in to evict and arrest anyone who failed to disperse.

The protesters received an initial wave of support but a hostile news media and a culture conditioned to sound bite answers and remote control democracy were turned off by a movement that offered no easy to digest plan and demanded active participation. Now as we enter winter the movement has been for the most part been swept off the street and now seems to be organizing to come up with a new strategy for next years upcoming election. Important because it seems as if both parties who can't agree on much seem united to increase the power of government over people while reducing the rights of individuals.

This is nothing new but an ominous and growing campaign that began in the early 1970's. The civil rights movement and the anti war movement scared the powers that be and what began as an issue for the far right has spread and taken over both major political parties. It has gotten to the point where a lot of the positions taken by the “liberal” president Democrat Obama are to the right of “conservative” Reagan. The two parties collude to limit the scope of the debate about issues and work to suppress candidates who don't want to follow the script.


Today we present three stories ripped from this weeks headlines that show how far to the right the government is moving.


First story comes from The Gaurdian UK seems to have escaped the American media.

NAACP warns black and Hispanic Americans could lose right to vote

Civil rights group petitions UN over 'massive voter suppression' after apparent effort to disenfranchise black and Hispanic people

Ed Pilkington in New York
guardian.co.uk, Monday 5 December 2011 22.34 GMT

The largest civil rights group in America, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is petitioning the UN over what it sees as a concerted effort to disenfranchise black and Latino voters ahead of next year's presidential election.
The organization will this week present evidence to the UN high commissioner on human rights of what it contends is a conscious attempt to "block the vote" on the part of state legislatures across the US. Next March the NAACP will send a delegation of legal experts to Geneva to enlist the support of the UN human rights council.
The NAACP contends that the America in the throes of a consciously conceived and orchestrated move to strip black and other ethnic minority groups of the right to vote. William Barber, a member of the association's national board, said it was the "most vicious, coordinated and sinister attack to narrow participation in our democracy since the early 20th century".

You say the Senate can't agree on anything? Wrong from BuzzFlash comes this outraged story.


US Military Can Now Arrest You and Hold You Indefinitely Without Trial Senate Says

JACQUELINE MARCUS FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

"November 29th 2011, the Senate voted on a bill that allows the US military to imprison civilians with no formal charges and hold them indefinitely with no trial.
The ACLU reports even US citizens wouldn't be immune as the legislation aims to declare national territory part of the "battlefield" in the War on Terror. You can read more about the NDAA provision here.
What it means: It's shocking to learn that the majority of representatives and senators have replaced our civil liberties with a de facto military dictatorship while no one is watching. How is the Levin-McCain provision different from Patriot Act laws? If an American citizen is seen as a threat to the government, that citizen will be denied his/her constitutional rights of protection, as Justin Raimondo at AntiWar.com correctly explained: "The provision would give the President the power to use the military to intern anyone - including American citizens - indefinitely, and hold them without charges or trial, anywhere in the world, including on American soil. The provision repeals the longstanding Posse Comitatus Act, which prevents the military from engaging in law enforcement on US territory - the greatest fear of the Founders."
The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) was supposed to be kept secret, drafted behind closed doors by Senators Carl Levin (D-Mich) and John McCain (R-Ariz). When a bill is supposed to be kept secret from the public, it usually means that it's against the public's interests.
"The White House has threatened to veto the legislation because of language that mandates military custody of terror suspects, but Wednesday's 88-12 cloture vote signals that the bill - which could pass as early as Thursday - will likely have the detainee provisions included in the chamber's final legislation." Unfortunately, the administration's veto threat has nothing to do with protecting civil liberties; their real objection is that it can create confusion between Homeland Security agencies and the F.B.I."

And if your going to give the government to wage a new war against it's own citizens where are you going to put all the new prisoners since the prisons are already full of victims of the drug war? Well there's the hundreds of internment camps that have been set up all across the country. This has been a story that has been around ever since the Patriot Act became law. One that has been very active in the past few weeks because of the previous story.

This story come from the Public Intelligence blog

Internment Camps for Isolating Unemployed in Federal “Work Camps”?

Al Martin, former Navy intelligence officer and former Wall Street broker, former Iran-contra co-conspirator with Ollie’s Follies, is starting to write about the possible use of the many civil unrest internment camps built in the US by Halliburton and related contractors. In his view, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), makes it possible for expanded use of the US military and expanded powers for law enforcement to “contain” the unemployed in work camps–which might be a good thing, in his view. [The bill passed the Senate but has not passed the House at this time.]
To read the entire post click here.



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